Author Topic: "REMINGTON Model 700 UNDER FIRE: A CNBC INVESTIGATION"  (Read 31590 times)

ZRow1

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"REMINGTON Model 700 UNDER FIRE: A CNBC INVESTIGATION"
« on: October 11, 2010, 08:59:24 PM »
"REMINGTON Model 700 UNDER FIRE: A CNBC INVESTIGATION"
One-Hour Documentary Reported by CNBC’s Senior Correspondent Scott Cohn to Premiere on CNBC on Wednesday, October 20th at 9PM ET/PT
http://tvbythenumbers.com/2010/10/11/cnbc-presents-%E2%80%9Cremington-under-fire-a-cnbc-investigation%E2%80%9D/67474


tombogan03884

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Re: "REMINGTON Model 700 UNDER FIRE: A CNBC INVESTIGATION"
« Reply #1 on: October 12, 2010, 01:36:09 AM »
FTA;

"This CNBC Original documentary examines allegations that the Remington Model 700- series hunting rifle is prone to firing without pulling the trigger, and that its manufacturer, Remington, has been aware of this concern for almost 60 years."


WTF  ? ?
Slow news week ?

billt

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Re: "REMINGTON Model 700 UNDER FIRE: A CNBC INVESTIGATION"
« Reply #2 on: October 12, 2010, 07:17:46 AM »
FTA;

"This CNBC Original documentary examines allegations that the Remington Model 700- series hunting rifle is prone to firing without pulling the trigger, and that its manufacturer, Remington, has been aware of this concern for almost 60 years."


WTF  ? ?
Slow news week ?

The Walker Fire Control Group has cost Remington Arms literally tens of millions of dollars, mostly when they were owned by Du Pont. Companies with deep pockets are always more lucrative come law suit time. The largest settlement was in the Luis case which $17,000,000.00 ($17 MILLION), was awarded.

http://www.mmmpalaw.com/CM/Custom/case7.asp

Monsees Miller Mayer Presley & Amick are a real good ambulance chaser firm who has a good track record in milking large jury settlements for people who drew blood out of their own stupidity with this weapon. If you follow all of the rules of gun safety, not one single injury would have occurred. Never point the gun at anything you do not intend to destroy!, has no bearing in a courtroom when an idiot mother shoots and kills her son with a weapon she never should have laid her hands on in the first place. Trial lawyers get around that by simply asking, "What is a safe direction to have a weapon pointed when it accidentally discharges?" If you read the particulars of many of these cases, a number of these accidents happened with the weapon being unloaded or loaded indoors. In over 40 years of shooting I have NEVER loaded or unloaded a hunting or target weapon inside my home. A self defense weapon is another story, and even then they'll be loaded outside. Even if and when I have to check the chambering of a handload, I always do it outside with the rifle, handgun, or shotgun pointed straight up into the air. There was simply no excuse for any of these accidents other than pure carelessness. I may sound harsh, but I've never advocated awarding people for being stupid and careless regardless of how tragic the outcome.

http://pagunowners.tripod.com/public/gunsafety.html

I have 4 Remington Model 700's in calibers from .22-250 up to and including .458 Winchester Magnum, and a Remington XP-100 Pistol in .35 Remington. Every one of them was purchased between 1972 and 1985. I've fired thousands of handloads, as well as factory loads through them without a single mishap or "accidental discharge". With that said I never use the safety on any rifle I've ever owned. I've always felt that was MY responsibility, not the responsibility of a stamped piece of sheet metal. Regardless of how it was designed.  Bill T.

fightingquaker13

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Re: "REMINGTON Model 700 UNDER FIRE: A CNBC INVESTIGATION"
« Reply #3 on: October 12, 2010, 07:29:29 AM »
Bill
While I don't disagree with you in principle, well.........
I know nothing more than scuttlebutt on the Rem 700. I would still buy one tomorrow. If they were all that fubared, we'd have probably heard about it. Still, as far as never loading a weapon indoors? Please ::). We've all done it, and will continue to do so. Yes, I clean and reload my Glock in the house. Same with my SD shotty. No, I don't load my target and range guns inside. They aren't loaded till I hit the field/range/skeet range. My carry weapon? That's a different animal. I think others will agree.
FQ13

billt

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Re: "REMINGTON Model 700 UNDER FIRE: A CNBC INVESTIGATION"
« Reply #4 on: October 12, 2010, 07:57:46 AM »
Still, as far as never loading a weapon indoors? We've all done it, and will continue to do so.
FQ13

It's a habit I've never gotten into. Besides a Remington 700 would make about the poorest excuse for a self defense gun on the planet. With that said, why would anyone want to load / unload one inside a house?  Bill T.

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Re: "REMINGTON Model 700 UNDER FIRE: A CNBC INVESTIGATION"
« Reply #5 on: Today at 07:39:16 AM »

Pathfinder

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Re: "REMINGTON Model 700 UNDER FIRE: A CNBC INVESTIGATION"
« Reply #5 on: October 12, 2010, 08:14:12 AM »
In over 40 years of shooting I have NEVER loaded or unloaded a hunting or target weapon inside my home. A self defense weapon is another story, and even then they'll be loaded outside. Even if and when I have to check the chambering of a handload, I always do it outside with the rifle, handgun, or shotgun pointed straight up into the air.

Still, as far as never loading a weapon indoors? Please ::). We've all done it, and will continue to do so. Yes, I clean and reload my Glock in the house. Same with my SD shotty. . . . My carry weapon? That's a different animal. I think others will agree.
FQ13

Bill, no sweat. FQ apparently didn't read your post, simply reacted to it. You clearly distinguished between SD and hunting guns. And it is a good habit - for those who can - to unload and reload a weapon outside. Many of us can't as a neighbor would call the cops. If I have to reload a firearm, I do it in the lower level, with nothing but dirt on the other side of the wall.

And unloading and reloading a Glock in a house? Remind me to stay away from FLA when FQ is "cleaning" his guns. Ain't the Glocks the ones you have to pull the trigger to take down for cleaning?
"I won't be wronged, I won't be insulted, I won't be laid a hand on. I don't do this to others and I require the same from them"

J.B. Books

fightingquaker13

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Re: "REMINGTON Model 700 UNDER FIRE: A CNBC INVESTIGATION"
« Reply #6 on: October 12, 2010, 08:32:31 AM »
Bill, no sweat. FQ apparently didn't read your post, simply reacted to it. You clearly distinguished between SD and hunting guns. And it is a good habit - for those who can - to unload and reload a weapon outside. Many of us can't as a neighbor would call the cops. If I have to reload a firearm, I do it in the lower level, with nothing but dirt on the other side of the wall.

And unloading and reloading a Glock in a house? Remind me to stay away from FLA when FQ is "cleaning" his guns. Ain't the Glocks the ones you have to pull the trigger to take down for cleaning?
Actually Path, in the spirit of board comaraderie, I will give your cheap (well, inexpensive, or maybe just slightly discounted) shot a pass. ;D Because honestly, Glocks did used to be dangerous in that regard. (As a side note, I have lived in too many apartments to take "outside" cleaning" areas for granted. Now, I have a garage).
On to the danger bit. Back in the day, late '80s to mid '90s, the Glock factory box came with a stud in the bottom. You were supposed to dry fire the pistol, locking the trigger back, and then fit the gun onto the stud, with the deppressed trigger allowing the guard to accomodate the stud. :o Obviously, the inevitable happened. I shared a house with a veteran DC cop. We were cleaning guns, he put his issue G-19 away, and BLAM! an ND. Scared us both to death (no alchohol involved, though lots afterward). Thing is, outside is better. Inside, is where most of us deal with our carry guns. Not trying to start a war here, just saying that how you deal with you deer gun/skeet gun, is different than day to day on a carry piece. We don't all have big back yards. If a twenty year veteran cop who was a gun guy can screw up with an idiot proof weapon, so can we. Lesson learned. Still, we deal with less than ideal circumstances. That's all I'm sayin'.
FQ13

ratcatcher55

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Re: "REMINGTON Model 700 UNDER FIRE: A CNBC INVESTIGATION"
« Reply #7 on: October 12, 2010, 09:12:33 AM »
I have a 700 BDL from that time frame and I do remember seeing a recall notice by Remington in a number of magazines. My rifle was not one of those recalled.

I did get the joy of standing next to a gentleman who's Model 12 decided to slam fire every time he loaded the shotgun on a trap line. After the third BANG he decided that maybe it was not safe to shoot. The gentleman in question had the weapon pointed in a safe direction so only the grass was damaged. That was the only AD I ever witnessed. I have seen several ND's however.

Bill is correct, you can't save folks from stupidity.

fightingquaker13

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Re: "REMINGTON Model 700 UNDER FIRE: A CNBC INVESTIGATION"
« Reply #8 on: October 12, 2010, 09:45:40 AM »
I have a 700 BDL from that time frame and I do remember seeing a recall notice by Remington in a number of magazines. My rifle was not one of those recalled.

I did get the joy of standing next to a gentleman who's Model 12 decided to slam fire every time he loaded the shotgun on a trap line. After the third BANG he decided that maybe it was not safe to shoot. The gentleman in question had the weapon pointed in a safe direction so only the grass was damaged. That was the only AD I ever witnessed. I have seen several ND's however.

Bill is correct, you can't save folks from stupidity.
I had a Bernadelli that did that. It was a lovely little 20 gauge 26" Italian over under. Straight stock, 5 1/2 pounds, gorgeous. After the 10th box? It went off when it felt like it. After the third time? Gone! There was just something in the design. It was the Fiat of guns. ;D It looked great, but God help you if you needed to use it. :o
FQ13 who still kind of misses it, but wont own a landmine like that :-\

jnevis

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Re: "REMINGTON Model 700 UNDER FIRE: A CNBC INVESTIGATION"
« Reply #9 on: October 12, 2010, 09:57:34 AM »
And unloading and reloading a Glock in a house? Remind me to stay away from FLA when FQ is "cleaning" his guns. Ain't the Glocks the ones you have to pull the trigger to take down for cleaning?

Nice try.  Since the first step in cleaning a firearm is MAKE SURE IT'S UNLOADED, does it matter if you pull the trigger when disassembling it?  
When seconds mean the difference between life and death, the police will be minutes away.

You are either SOLVING the problem, or you ARE the problem.

 

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